Exciting news to report, yesterday we purchased two 20 foot yurts, well the better part of two yurts that is. The yurts came from a heli ski operation and were used as backcountry cabins for 5 years, and one year there were not maintained and the snow load exceeded 6 feet in a short period of time and the structures failed. What we have is all the tarps; wall and ceiling, insulation, and windows, and a door. Luckily the missing parts are all simple wood construction, and I just happen to know a skilled wood worker with a big ‘ol pile of fir! So what does this mean for the home front? Well, improved and hugely extended guest accommodations, and likely an art studio suite as well 🙂

This also means that very very early in the spring season we will be able to sleep a lot more people comfortably, which is great! * Just a shout out to friends and family, we’ll be looking for extra futons, mattresses and beds come spring time, so keep us in mind as we furnish your future get away in paradise. We are planning to put one yurt just below the trailer down on the fruit tree level, and the other will be in the nicely treed area between the back of the garden and the wood shop, this is the area we plan to further develop with an outdoor cookhouse, the washhouse, outhouse, and tree houses as well as out first foam home; essentially this wooded area will be primarily for guest use; B&B, workshop attendees and facilities and woofer housing. This upcoming season will be even more exciting and busy than the last.

As for the present day, we have finally reached such an epic snowload that our driveway is totally unusable, we are using the lower drive which is questionable at best but makes for a great cardo routine a few time a day hoofing it uphill through deep snow, from the workshop (which sits unroofed still). Mia can actually tell her grand kids one day that when she was a child she had to walk uphill through knee deep snow to get to school everyday and carry the groceries up the mountian side on a sled! The upside is that the big driveway makes a killer toboggan hill!

Sadly our last trip home marked the start of what has been a never ending dump of snow so progress has paused on lots of projects. Luckily though Dyl got most of the frame work and roofing up for the mud room addition and has really mastered tensioning these foam blocks and framing with them, in a fashion not unlike non-load bearing straw bale construction. So we have a covered, dry insulated though un-floored area which the dog uses more than any of us, but it does a great job buffering the cold air coming into the house.

The weather is mild, the valley is stunning and we are taking in a old fashioned European Christmas on the Lake celebration this weekend, and we are all looking forward to fire roasted chestnuts and perusing local crafters.

I poached the above picture from the web (clearly this is not my work*lol), but check out pacific yurts website for images of the type of yurts we have.

Advertisements