This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And then there were three…

Tuesday was a warm silent day, hazzy from forest fire smoke and we are just three out here on the mountain now after the buzz and excitement of hosting a dozen fabulous family and friends for the past week we are settling back into valley time and our new rural routine. It was wonderful to see so many faces we miss and we feel really blessed to have such eager hard working and loyal friends in our lives! We shared great meals always with elements fresh from the garden, we indulged in a number of sweat tipi sessions, we enjoyed the stunning slocan river afloat inflatable crafts of all sorts. We explored the amazing Nelson farmers market, enjoyed the growing chickens, fooz’d, cool pooled, and some even rode the newly installed electrical fence for entertainment!

The boys labored ridiculously hard falling, bucking, skinning, hauling, and in some cases burning and burring, tamping and setting really large dead standing cedars from our land. As Ben will attest to (being a city boy, experienced carpentered not unlike Dylan and Dave) retrieving your wood materials from the bush rather than a home depot or a delivered skid makes for a serious investment in sweat and blood, time and manpower. I am shocked at the efforts that went into getting 30 some trees down to our newly excavated site for the wood shop. Initially Ben and Dyl spent the better part of the week just hauling the 10 big posts to site and digging half of the 4-6 foot deep holes to set them in. This equation went something like this… 2 man power + 1 chain saw x 1 undersized winch + Egyptian inspiration = 1 small step toward the big dream and one giant step towards a wonderful space for invention and creation.

The guys were off to a heck of a start to the 10 sided yurt / pole building when Dave, Colin and Jonathon showed up and I think Dyl and Ben were relieved to hand off the shovels to some fresh and youthful blood, full of spit and vinegar! I am not sure if Colin and Jonathon have ever worked so hard in there 17 years of life but they were keen and strong and we certainly couldn’t have done it without them! Those 5 guys also welcomed the long log wrapping arms of Matt and Mike. These troops slaved through some rainy over cast skies with the occasional inspiration of fresh baked treats, cold beers and hearty meals. The gals; Dayna, Helen, Annie & Mia worked steadfast; shopping for local farm fresh foods to prepare and serve to keep the troops fed and happy. This made for a whack of gardening, chopping, washing, stirring, serving, and dishes so I was really happy to have the beautiful lady reinforcements keeping my kitchen and daughter so peachy clean! These girls readlly kept the weekend and the build ticking along wonderfully. I just adore spending time with Dylan’s family, and words can’t express the gratefulness I feel to have fallen in love with a man with a family so wonderfully easy to love!

Dylan and I hurried to get many tasks completed before everyone started arriving and that included settling into a rhythm with the birds living in the garden, prepping the site for the shop yurt, double checking our river floating route with lazy tube trips over the rapids, getting some more lower cabinet boxes into the kitchen and trying to make it presentable, setting up an old horse trough with a insulated base and a liner as a cool pool (ideal for rapid body cool downs much needed multiple times a day when your trying to garden, or dig, or saw, or haul and it’s over 30ºC), Also it is the perfect way to end a steam in the little tipi turned sweathouse. The big project we also started the week before our big crew arrived was building the garden shed.

This week we will finish skinning the poles for the rafters and the beams and hopefully get a little loft added to the garden shed for Mia to play in. If Dylan and I can get these 3 last poles into the shed, I can start working on the winter coop for the chooks and drag an old tub into the space to set up for more worms, while Dylan is away Earthship-ing. In the past I have had some good experience with vermicomposting and I am looking forward to doing a larger scale black gold operation inside of an insulated tub base we hauled out of a junk pile on the land. I had grand ideas of having the worms positioned below the coop to collect the wood shavings and chicken manure 🙂 with out much effort from me, but after some research it seems than unlike rabbits, chickens produce a waste that isn’t very good for worms. But I am playing with an idea for a chicken feed area which self feeds the worm bin the chicken refuse and what little waste may come from a feed area. You would think that chickens would know not to shit in their food but they don’t! what is up with that. Speaking of the chickens though… They are getting so big and beautiful! some of them have just stunning spotted and striped feathers immersing, I just love opening the coop in the morning and they all come running down the ramp and out into the sunshine to peck and play.

Today I stood on the front lawn gazing at the laundry drying in the smoke diffused sunlight admiring the bountiful garden listening to the happy chicken hum and as I meandered down the grassy path past the new pee bale towards Dylan, down on the shop site skinning yet another log with a hand draw knife I have become very friendly with, and I thought wow this is really happening! Here we are doing what we have talked about doing for so many years; in the mountains, in a community, growing food, building, learning and teaching. This is the very start of something so much bigger than our dreams and I am so very blessed to be here in this moment moving in this direction.

love and thanks to everyone and special big hugs and gratitude to our visitors this week xo.

* I have only pictures of Dayna and my feet 😦 no other shots, I would love some of the pictures that were taken of all of us at diner, etc.

Advertisements